Transportation Safety Board of Canada
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  RAIL REPORTS - 2004 - R04T0008

Appendices

  1. Appendix A - Upgrades to Canadian Pacific Railway's Centralized Traffic Control System for Detection of Unidentified Track Occupancies
  2. Appendix B - Revised Canadian Pacific Railway Rail Traffic Control Train Planning Sheet
  3. Appendix C - Changes to Canadian Pacific Railway's General Operating Instructions and RTC Manual
  4. Appendix D - List of Supporting Reports
  5. Appendix E - Glossary

Appendix A - Upgrades to Canadian Pacific Railway's Centralized Traffic Control System for Detection of Unidentified Track Occupancies

(Document provided by Canadian Pacific Railway)

Effective Friday July 16th 2004 upgrades will be made to the CTC system. These upgrades will better assist the RTC in detecting Unidentified Track Occupancies (UTOs) left behind a tagged train.

UTO Detection

This upgrade will give RTCs an alert when possible UTOs are found. This upgrade is only capable of assisting RTCs, it is not an absolute tool for alerting RTCs to possible track defects. Daily in the territory controlled from GCS, there is over 1400 Unidentifed Occupancies shown on CTC panels. Due to the sheer volume of these occurrences, various filters have been put in place to avoid unnecessarily over alerting the RTC. For this reason, RTCs must be aware of the limitations of this upgrade and not rely solely on the alert.

When a track occupancy occurs behind a tagged train, the following alert will appear on the RTCs workstation:

Appendix A - Alert appearing on work station

Appendix A.  Alert appearing on work station

Response

Before acknowledging a UTO notice, the RTC must evaluate the situation to determine whether or not the alert is an actual UTO. If it is found to be a UTO, the RTC must follow the process for UTOs. The information must be recorded on the train sheet and the adjoining RTC and AMRTC must be notified.

Filters

The alert will only appear for occupancies which remain for a period greater than 1 minute. This use of this filter reduces the alerts to the RTC by 79% recognizing that:

  • It is common to temporarily see a track light when a train moves over a controlled locations and splits. This is due to a lag in the signal system reaching the office and generally disappear in less than one minute.

The alert will only appear for occupancies left behind a tagged train. One of the filters in place is the requirement for the occupancy to be tagged. This filter is in place in recognition of the facts that:

  • A number of these unidentified occupancies are related to regular operation and do not necessarily indicate a possible track defect.
  • The RTCs do extremely well in terms of tagging train movements.

The alert will only appear on main tracks and signalled sidings. This filter reduces the alerts 1% recognizing the fact that:

  • Movements departing yard tracks could appear to leave occupancies that can be related to open switches or other movements approaching the signal location.
  • Any occupancy in a non bonded siding is related to the system and portrays no indication on possible defects.

The alert will only appear when the movement is not within the limits of any block. That block would include any blocking placed by the system in response to an authority; 564, 566, TOPBT, etc. or blocking placed manually; GBO blocking, manual block. Through filtering these type of occurrences the alerts are further reduced 1% recognizing that:

  • A number of these unidentified occupancies are related to regular operation and do not necessarily indicate a possible track defect.

The alert will not appear for the following:

  • Track occupancies that randomly appear, i.e. are not after the immediate passing of a tagged train.
  • Track occupancies at crew change points between subdivisions where the following trains are typically not yet tagged.
  • As stated above for:
    • - untagged train movements.
    • - occupancies that do not remain for longer than one minute.
    • - occupancies on yard approach tracks or non bonded sidings.
    • - in track blocked by an authority or manual block.
    • - occupancies that appear and are not following a tagged train movement, out of the blue.

This upgrade can be further changed based on input received from the RTCs. We recognize that the RTCs are busy performing other relevant functions and are concerned that unnecessarily alerting the RTCs may have a negative effect. If you are finding that you are receiving a large amount of unnecessary alerts, bring it to the attention of the Assistant Manager RTC.

Appendix B - Revised Canadian Pacific Railway Rail Traffic Control Train Planning Sheet

Appendix B - Revised Canadian Pacific Railway Rail Traffic Control Train Planning Sheet

(Note section for documenting unidentified track occupancies in the centre of the train sheet.)

Appendix C - Changes to Canadian Pacific Railway's General Operating Instructions and RTC Manual

SUBJECT: Additional instructions to GOI Section 1 - Page 10

POLICY FOR UNIDENTIFIED TRACK OCCUPANCY (UTO) BEHIND A TRAIN

These instructions are being put in place by Order of Transport Canada and to improve understanding and communication between RTCs and Train Crews.

POLICY FOR UNIDENTIFIED TRACK OCCUPANCY (UTO) BEHIND A TRAIN OR ENGINE

  • 1. When more than one unknown Track Occupancy Light appears on an RTC display screen after the passage of the same train or engine, the RTC must immediately notify the crew to stop and inspect.
  • 2. The speed of the movement must be immediately reduced to 10 MPH and a pull-by inspection performed at the first safe location, avoiding impediments to a safe inspection such as bridges.
  • 3. The inspection must include a pull-by inspection of one side of the equipment at a speed not exceeding 10 MPH, followed by a stationary inspection on the other side. BOTH sides of ALL cars and locomotives must be inspected for potential wheel defects. Inspection of entire train or engine movement must be completed even if defects are found.

Note: This inspection must be performed by either a crew member or qualified Field Operations personnel.

  • 4. If any wheels are found or suspected to have defects, that piece of equipment must be set off at that location if possible, OR moved at a speed not exceeding 10 MPH to the nearest location where it can be set off, but only if deemed safe to move by the person making the inspection.
  • 5. Results of the inspection must be recorded on the Crew to Crew form, noting "UTO inspection".
  • 6. If another UTO is displayed behind a train or engine that has already received a UTO inspection, such movement must again be stopped immediately until full inspection can be made by a certified car inspector.

Note: All other provisions dealing with a UTO on page 5 of the RTC Manual remain unchanged.

RTC Record Keeping Between Adjoining RTC's:

In addition to the above instructions, immediately upon noticing that a train has left a UTO behind, the RTCs must:

  • 1. Record the train ID, subdivision and the location of the UTO below the train ID column on the top centre portion of the train-planning sheet.
  • 2. RTC's are responsible to verbally advise the adjoining RTC when a UTO is left on behind a train. (Train ID, subdivision and location) This information must be recorded on the train-planning sheet.
  • 3. This information must also be recorded in the Transfer Information Editor (TIE) by both RTCs until the train has left their subdivision.

Asst Director MOC

Appendix D - List of Supporting Reports

The following TSB Engineering Laboratory report was completed:

LP 016/2004 - Wheel Failure, Articulated Platform Car, Mile 178.2, Belleville Subdivision, 14 January 2004

This report is available upon request from the Transportation Safety Board of Canada.

Appendix E - Glossary

AAR Association of American Railroads
AMRTC assistant manager, rail traffic control
ATC air traffic control
ATMS assistant track maintenance supervisor
cm centimetres
CN Canadian National
CPR Canadian Pacific Railway
CROR Canadian Rail Operating Rules
CTC Centralized Traffic Control System
CWR continuous welded rail
ES Engineering Services
EST eastern standard time
FRA Federal Railroad Administration
GBO General Bulletin Order
GOIs General Operating Instructions
HBD hot box detector
km/h kilometres per hour
m metres
mm millimetres
mph miles per hour
MTD main-track derailment
NMC Network Management Centre
POD point of derailment
psi pounds per square inch
RSA Rail Safety Advisory
RSI Rail Safety Information Letter
RTC rail traffic controller
S&C Signals and Communication
SAL Service Alert Level
SBU sense and braking unit
SMS Safety Management System
Southern Abex Southern Corporation
SPC Standard Practice Circular
TC Transport Canada
TEC track evaluation car
TIE Transfer Information Editor
TMS track maintenance supervisor
TOP track occupancy permit
TP Transport Publication
TSB Transportation Safety Board of Canada
UTO unidentified track occupancy
WILD wheel impact load detector
WIS wayside inspection system
ºC degrees Celsius
ºF degrees Fahrenheit

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1. Glossary at Appendix E for all abbreviations and acronyms.

2. All times are EST (Coordinated Universal Time minus five hours).

3. Sense and braking unit (SBU) - A system of components that senses brake pipe pressure, motion and direction, and transmits this information to the head end of the train

4. Each car has a valve that controls communication between the car air brake system and the brake pipe. When a car is cut out, the valve is turned to disengage the air brake system on the car, allowing air to pass directly through the car without compromising the continuity of the brake pipe.

5. Doubled - When a train is too long to fit in one track, it is broken into two or more blocks of cars.

6. Yarded - The train is parked and tied down

7. An unidentified track occupancy (UTO) occurs when a portion of the track is displayed as occupied on the screen of an RTC, when no train is known to be present.

8. Block - A section of track that can be distinguished from other sections by signal indications

9. Light engines - A train composed of only locomotives

10. Source of weather information: Environment Canada, recorded at the Whitby Mueller Weather Station at 1700 on 14 January 2004

11. This wheel was sent to the TSB Engineering Laboratory for analysis.

12. RTCs are paid for an additional 15 minutes to carry out a handover to the RTC in the next shift. AMRTCs may spend longer in their handover to the next AMRTC on duty.

13. Because the safety-critical events occurred during RTC 3's work shift, RTC 3 will be referred to as "the RTC," unless otherwise indicated.

14. Because the safety-critical events occurred during AMRTC 2's work shift, AMRTC 2 will be referred to as "the AMRTC," unless otherwise indicated.

15. CPR has implemented a program to control damage to track and rolling stock during extreme weather conditions. Ambient temperature readings at HBD locations are communicated directly to train crews. Crews are required to adjust their speed accordingly.

16. Inspection locations are designated in the service design of each railway, as filed with Transport Canada.

17. CPR's General Operating Instructions, Section 5, Subsection 4.0, "Pre departure Inspection Procedures (by other than a certified car inspector)," 01 March 2002

18. Signal blocking is placed on track blocks by the RTC to prevent the movement of trains for safety reasons (for example, protecting track workers).

19. A.R. Isaac and B. Ruitenberg, Air Traffic Control: Human Performance Factors, Ashgate, Aldershot, 1999

20. Railway Association of Canada, Railway Rules Governing Safety Critical Positions, TC 0-17A, 16 June 2000

21. Railway Association of Canada, Railway Medical Rules for Positions Critical to Safe Railway Operations, TC 0-17B, 16 June 2000

22. Training provided to AMRTCs on human factors in 2002 did include a theoretical description of workload; however, this AMRTC did not attend the training.

23. If the temperature is below -25°C, HBDs will communicate speed restrictions directly to train crews (but not to the RTC).

24. TP 13742E, Report to the Tripartite Steering Committee on ATC Fatigue

25. The Transfer Information Editor is a computer tool for creating and maintaining a permanent electronic record of information that the RTC wishes to document for the next shift.

26. New Hire Pre-Course Material, Calgary 2002

27. RTC Manual, p. 6

28. New Hire Pre-Course Material, Calgary 2002, Module 14 (RTC Planning Sheet), p. 5. CPR's RTC Manual

29. CPR's RTC Manual, p. 5

30. RTC New Hire Pre-Course Material (Revised 2000), Calgary, Module 3, Railway Operations, p. 61

31. Train identification name on the CTC screen

32. This is a communication by the crew members to the RTC providing notice that they will need to be relieved by another crew by a particular time.

33. Established by SOR/2001-37, 09 January 2001, pursuant to Section 37 and Subsection 47.1(1) of the Railway Safety Act, in force on 31 March 2001

34. TP 13548, Railway Safety Management System Guide, February 2001, Section 4(2) Environment Canada Belleville Weather Station

35. TP 13548, Railway Safety Management System Guide, February 2001, Section 4(2)

36. Environment Canada Belleville Weather Station

37. CPR, Winter Plan 2003/2004

38. CPR, Winter Plan 2003/2004, Executive Overview

39. CPR, Winter Plan 2003/2004, Montréal service area

40. 2004 Field Manual of the AAR Interchange Rules, Rule 41(f), Wheels, Shattered rim (break shows a smooth fracture)

41. CPR's RTC Manual, 19 August 2002, p. 5

42. The Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board Act requires that federal ministers provide formal responses to the TSB recommendations within 90 days. The TSB assesses responses and makes the assessments public on its Web site. For information on assessment ratings and current assessments, visit the TSB Web site.